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Service Failure: Samsung June 19, 2013

Posted by David Dirks in Building trust, Customer Service.
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DirksProPhotoI own a great Samsung DLP TV and have had it for about five years.  Just recently the color started faltering so I went online and sent a request on the Samsung service site for some…service.  A few days later I received an email from someone from the CA offices of Samsung.  Their email stated in part that they would make three attempts to contact us to arrange service.  He noted in his email that this was their first attempt.  So…I emailed him back the same day – thinking time was everything.

The next day – after only the first attempt – Samsung sent me an email to let me know they cancelled my request for service.  No reason.  Just canceled.  So, I emailed the nice fellow (had no phone number or otherwise I would have just called him).  I let him know that I had just rec’d a note from Samsung stating they cancelled my service request and that I in fact WANTED service – a paying customer!

Result:  Nothing.  No email response.  No nothing.  And of course, no service.  Well, that was the end of my efforts to work directly with Samsung and their dedicated service provider.

Ok.  So the next day I go online and find a local TV repair service.  I fill out the service request form and send it via  their website.  Result: No call since and it’s been three days.  I guess they are just too busy for a PAYING CUSTOMER like myself.  What business are these people in?

What to do?  I turn to Sears.  I go online and within a few minutes am able to schedule a service appointment.  Done.  Now let’s see if they show up.  I’ll let you know how this saga plays out in a subsequent blog post.  Stay tuned.

UPDATE 070213: So Sears won the day.  Not only was I easily able to set up an appointment for a repair person to come out to my house they also called to confirm the appointment (on top of the email confirmation).  The repair person was professional, clean and knew his stuff.  Problem solved for only $99.00 (which is credited to any repairs too).

Those other guys who never called me?  I found out later that they are just about out of business.  No wonder.

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Building rapport in a global environment June 20, 2009

Posted by rickbron in Bronder On People, Building rapport, Building trust, Communication, Global leadership, Knowing your people, Leading globally, Management, Networking.
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Building rapport with global team member is a daunting task for most global team leaders.  The Big Dogz know that using a structured approach and a consistent information capturing tool goes a long way toward helping you be effective at building rapport over the chasms of time and distance.

In building rapport, the first thing all effective leaders focus upon is the people. What do I want to know about my team members? What information would be useful for me to customize my approach and interactions with the team member? Actually, the techniques for building rapport over time and distance are no different from building rapport face to face.

Create a list of topics that would be useful for you.

Here are some work related examples:

What job experiences do they have?

What are their career objectives?

What is their preferred communication style?

How do they like to receive feedback?

What is their favorite (most and least) work assignment?

What are their strengths?

What skills would they like to acquire?

What is the anniversary of them joining the company or your team?

Here are some personal related examples:

What is their commute?

What hobbies do they have?

What pressures do they experience outside of work?

What is their family situation?

When is theiur birthday?

Who are the people they admire?

What is their favorite television show?

Do they like sports? What teams?

Another key set of information that may be useful in a global environment is cultural data such as:

National holidays

Tourist attractions

Key historical events

National heroes

National sports teams

Public figures

Geography

Climate

You can develop your own list of information that would be helpful to you. Try to fill in the information for each item that would be useful for you.

Acquiring this information is an art form in itself! I am not suggesting you conduct an interrogation to discover the answers to these or other questions you may have about your team members. An effective technique to help you discover both work and personal related information is to first share something about yourself. To discover someone’s hobby, you might mention that you went on a hike this weekend and enjoy hiking. They may respond that hiking is not something they do, but they prefer cycling. Or, they may not respond at all. The key is to listen for information that can help you build rapport.

Once you have acquired information that is useful to you, I suggest you put that information into a file related to this person. Sales people use this technique when acquiring information about key clients. Standard contact management software like Outlook and BlackBerry have specific places where you can store this information. I am not well known for my ability to recall information about people, so for me, this technique is quite useful. Prior to making contact with people, I frequently review my information file to allow me to customize my approach to them.

The Big Dogz also know that people are interested in them. Think about what you would want your global team members to know about you. Prepare a short introduction presentation and deliver it to any new team members. Periodically review the salient points of your introduction at team meetings. Give people an opportunity to build rapport with you.

Focus on what information is important, capture that information and use it to customize your approach to building rapport with global team members.

Building Trust October 27, 2007

Posted by rickbron in Bronder On People, Building trust.
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p5130012.jpg More profit! A 2002 Watson Wyatt survey showed that companies where trust in the leadership was high had three times the total return of companies where trust in leadership was low. The Big Dogz know that trust is the biggest key to their success. It is amazing but true that less than 2 out of 5 employees trust their leadership. This lack of trust translates into significant negative impact on the bottom line. So, what are some of the benefits associated with high trust?

  • Multiplies creativity
  • Saves time and energy
  • Higher productivity
  • Less turnover
  • More initiative
  • Higher growth
  • More revenue

 Trust is not a one time event; it is a series of actions over time that creates a foundation where people can take risks with you. What are some of the risks that people could take with you?

  • Ask you for help when they need it
  • Tell you the “real” status of a project
  • Give you ideas to improve your business
  • Provide feedback to you on your performance as a leader
  • Inform you of danger in your proposals

 Without trust in your leadership, people will not take these risks with you. You can build trust in your leadership by engaging in specific actions. Here are a few:

  • Make solid decisions that help the company and people
  • Communicate effectively
  • Adopt ideas from your people
  • Provide honest feedback
  • Keep your promises
  • Apologize when you hurt someone
  • Ask for help when you need it

 These actions sound simple, and they are! However, building trust is not easy. It takes focus, commitment and practice. We all know what we need to do to create trust, but we don’t always do it.  

Take the attached self assessment about how you are building trust in your leadership. Use the self assessment to help you focus on and practice effective trust building actions. Make sure calibrate this self assessment. See my post on self assessments. https://growingmybusiness.wordpress.com/category/self-assessments/

 building-trust-self-assessment.doc