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Where’s Your YouTube Channel? September 19, 2012

Posted by David Dirks in Becoming A Thought Leader, Digital Media Strategy, YouTube Channel Strategy.
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Do you have your own YouTube Channel for your business?  If yes, congrats to you as you are taking advantage of yet another great opportunity to expand you market presence and brand.  Oh, and you’ll be able to sell more products or services over time too.  If you answered that question with a no, then I can’t tell you how disappointed I am that your business doesn’t have its own YouTube Channel.

YouTube used to be the place were you could see cuddly little animals performing stupid tricks (or sometimes funny ones).  Or it was the place you’d find dumb pranks or really dumb tricks.  It still is but to a much lesser extent than before…especially when Google decided to purchase YouTube and make it part of its product family a few short years ago.  Since them, Google has really revved up the YouTube business engines.  The YouTube of today is moving in the direction of providing original programming, providing an expanded array of advertising options and now a vastly improved (and valuable) analytics package like its great Google Analytics does for websites today.

So, why consider building a YouTube Channel?  For one, YouTube represents a huge organic search engine with literally millions and millions of people scouring for information on just about any topic you can think of (that is legal and not pornagraphic of course).  Think of YouTube as you do with Google’s organic search engine.  Every day people are looking for information products, services, ideas on a wide variety of topics…including whatever it is your business does and how it does it.

I don’t care what business you are in, people are looking for real and valuable information that will in some way help them.  I can also tell you what they aren’t looking for: being sold a product or service…at least not directly like some carnival barker.

Want to see the emerging direction of YouTube?  Check out this channel:

http://www.youtube.com/howcast

Notice that Howcast has over 389,000 subscribers and over 650,000,000 views…something we marketers dream about.  Now, you might not have that many subscribers or views but you certainly can develop a large following in the context of your business model.

Here’s an example of a law firm that has developed a YouTube channel that drives between 30-40% of their new client flow.

http://www.youtube.com/sparandbernstein

Spar and Bernstein has 529 subscribers which is excellent but the telling number is the 742,000+ views the channel has had since it started in 2007.  The video on most of its 546 clips is not the best quality but that doesn’t stop people searching for information on immigration law from finding and watching it.  Brad Bernstein, who in my opinion is not only a top notch immigration attorney but also a marketing visionary.  In 2007, he decided to tape his daily radio show and then post the video clips of the show onto his YouTube channel.  The results over time have been spectacular in the context of driving real business to the firm.  And, if you watch the videos, they are educational as Bernstein is answer live questions from his radio show listener audience.

YouTube.  It’s not the old YouTube you used to know.
Watch for more upcoming posts on establishing a YouTube channel for your business.  You can do it!

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7 Steps to Social Media Marketing Success July 19, 2011

Posted by David Dirks in Digital Media Strategy, Social Media Marketing.
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There was a time not long ago when ‘going digital’ meant that your business had to have a website.  However, having a website presence is no longer enough.  To reach more prospects and keep current clients from wandering away, creating and leveraging social media marketing tools like Facebook or Twitter can be critical.

Social media marketing (SMM) is simply the process of creating and engaging both prospective and current customers using social networks, online communities, blogs, and other digital platforms.  The ‘social’ aspect social media marketing means that there is a two-way dialogue between you and your customers.

According to the 2011 Social Media Marketing Industry report, businesses noted three essential benefits of social media marketing.  First, it provides a way to stand out in an increasingly distracted world.  Secondly, SMM can help improve your search engine rankings over time.  And last but not least, SMM can generate qualified leads for your business.

Small business owners are already taxed for time trying to attend to daily business matters.  Now they find themselves trying to figure out how to create and leverage SMM.

Here are 7 key steps that should be considered as you establish a social media marketing strategy for your business.

1.  Have a goal for your social media strategy.  Social media without goals is aimless.   If you create a Facebook Fan page, you need to be clear about the type conversations you want to engage prospects and clients in and the results you expect.

The Orange County Business Accelerator, (www.facebook.com/OCAcelerator), for example, uses its Facebook page primarily to promote its latest workshops and forums.  Filling seats for their workshops is the goal.

Local author Gene Ladd (http://tinyurl.com/GeneLadd) uses his Facebook page to engage his readers and followers in discussions related to topics covered in his nutrition and spirituality books.  His goal is to grow his following with like-minded people who are also potential buyers of his books.

2.  Social media choices: less is more.  Focus on a few key social media platforms and excel on them.  With literally hundreds of digital platforms to choose from, start with one, say a blog, Facebook Fan Page, Twitter, or your own YouTube channel.  Once you establish a presence on that platform, then invest time in learning it inside and out before adding any other social media platforms.  The idea is to only take on what you have time to handle.

Stick with the basic and most popular social media sites like YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, WordPress, Linkedin, Blogger, and BlogTalkRadio.  In most cases, I highly recommend starting with a simple blog or at most, a Facebook Fan page at first.  Neither costs anything to start other than your investment of time.

3.  Social media marketing is a content beast.  You should be prepared to feed the beast on a regular and consistent basis.  The basic types of content are written (i.e. blog or Fan Page post), video (i.e. YouTube.com), and audio (i.e. BlogTalkRadio.com).

Develop & produce fresh, relevant, and compelling content as often as you can.   To take some of the pressure off of yourself, encourage your partners and/or employees to also provide relevant business content whenever possible.

Create content that can be distributed across multiple social media platforms.  For example, Manhattan-based immigration attorney Brad Bernstein video records his daily radio show and then uploads it to his web radio channel (www.blogtalkradio.com/sparbernstein) and his YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/sparandbernstein).

Bernstein’s YouTube channel gets an average of 4,000 views each week.  Since he created it in 2007, his channel has garnered over 526,000 views and translates into booked consultations with prospective clients every week.
4.  Make your social media easy to find and link everything together.  What good is a blog or a YouTube channel if no one can find it?  If you have a website, make sure to link every social media property you have to it.

5.  Promote your social media sites constantly.  Promoting your social media marketing platforms is a 24/7 task.  Add your social media addresses to your email signature, on your business stationary, and your website of course.  Most social media sites allow you to add links so you can cross-promote on every site you have.

6.  Engage your audience.  Ask questions or discuss key issues in the context of your industry and business.  Create an open loop that encourages people to respond back.  Remember, social media means you have to be ‘social’.
7.  Social media marketing for the long haul.  All too often I see businesses that start a blog, Facebook page or some other social media presence and then flounder with little follow-up.  Eventually their social media efforts dwindle in direct proportion to their flagging investment of time creating and posting content.

Keep in mind that when you first engage in social media marketing, it will seem to take forever to build a following.  Like top athletes, you’ll ‘hit the wall’ on social media effort.  Keep pushing forward until you get your ‘second wind’ to keep up your social media efforts.

Most social media sites cost little to establish your business presence on.  The real cost is in creating and then sharing content that is relevant and engages your prospective and current customers.

If you can consistently create and share content with your social media audience of prospects and customers, you’ll be that much farther ahead of your competition.  Be assured that most are still asleep at the wheel of the social media opportunity but not for long.